Brexit: Open Letter from 100 British Companies

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Brexit: Open Letter from 100 British Companies

In an open letter initiated by the British Chamber of Industry (CBI) on 18th September 2017, 100 British companies demand an interim solution for Brexit over a period of three years after Brexit in 2019 in order to protect jobs both in the UK and in the EU. Obviously, the UK companies do not believe that an orderly Brexit can be negotiated within the set time frame. Nor do most of the observers of the current Brexit negotiations. For very good reasons, British industry is already afraid of the consequences for the jobs of EU foreigners both in the UK and Continental Europe. In reality, there is more at stake for the UK than there is for the much bigger EU. This desperate appeal of British companies faces the demand of EU negotiators to settle the exit principles first before negotiating any future relationship including job protection.

It is time to cut the Gordian knot on both sides of the negotiating table. Boris Johnson’s idea that the UK can walk away from the costly consequences of Brexit is just as illusionary as is the EU negotiator’s position to rigidly stick to the Brexit Agenda of past and future. We live in the presence which combines both the past and the future as Michael Ende’s book ‘Momo’ so convincingly describes. Those political forces in the UK which believe that the British Commonwealth and revived individual economic relations with major industrial nations such as the US and Japan or Canada can compensate for the loss of political and economic ties with Continental Europe are either hopelessly romantic or deliberately drunk. It is time for a round of soda water.

Bertrand Prell
Rechtsanwalt & Solicitor

Bertrand Prell
Bertrand Prell
Bertrand H. Prell is a German practising lawyer admitted to the Frankfurt Bar as Rechtsanwalt in January 1988 as well as a qualified Solicitor (uncertificated) for England und Wales admitted in 1992. He is specialised in advising medium sized companies in Germany and abroad. In particular he advises companies in the following sectors: Advising infrastructure projects worldwide, particularly in emerging markets IT and telekommunication M&A transactions Aviation, air traffic control and cargo Commercial agents, distributors and joint ventures Publishing Commercial properties He advises companies regarding employment law, company and commercial law, publishing law, aviation la was well as all issues regarding cross-border transactions or disputes between German and Common Law countries. Furthermore, Mr. Prell has experience in International and National Arbitration, Mediation and Adjudication as well as advising companies tendering for EU-projects or under the investigation of the European Commission (OLAF). Business language is German and English. Herr Prell is a member of the Frankfurt Bar Association (Rechtsanwaltskammer Frankfurt as well of the German Institute of Arbitration(Deutschen Institut für Schiedsgerichtsbarkeit - DIS).